June 30, 2017

BC3 Journal Article “Why do some economies benefit more from climate finance than others? A case study on North-to-South financial flows”

The Copenhagen and Paris Agreements, in which developed countries committed to mobilise USD 100 billion a year by 2020, indicate that climate finance will continue to grow. Even though economic development is not the aim of climate finance, climate-related disbursements will generate an economic impact on recipient countries’ economies. This impact will also reach other countries (including climate finance donors) through induced international trade. In this paper, we apply a structural decomposition analysis to study why the economic impact of climate finance varies between countries.
June 29, 2017

BC3 recognized as one of the 2016 Top Climate Think Tanks in Europe specialized in climate change and climate policy

June 28, 2017

BC3 Journal Article “Toward a theory of farmer conservation attitudes: Dual interests and willingness to take action to protect water quality”

Water quality in the Midwestern United States is threatened as a result of agricultural runoff. Based on self-reported data from a survey of farmers in Indiana, we aim to provide a better understanding of how awareness of water quality problems, farm-as-business attitudes, and stewardship attitudes are related to each other and willingness to improve water quality.
June 24, 2017

Interview to BC3 Researchers in the radio programme Más de palabras (Radio Euskadi)”¿Qué pasaría con un verano sin hielo en el océano ártico?”

June 22, 2017

Press Release (2017-06-22) “Sustainability whack-a-mole”

"Sustainability whack-a-mole"Placed-based sustainability efforts often fail to recognise the risk of turning up the environmental pressure elsewhereIn the world of arcades, the whack-a-mole is a classic. The game, in which players use a mallet to hit randomly appearing toy moles back into their holes, is an innocent reminder that fixing a problem in one place may only cause others to pop up elsewhere. But within sustainability, such problem solving come with more serious consequences. Coined environmental leakage, it refers to how interventions aimed at reducing environmental pressures at one site may be locally successful, but increase pressures elsewhere. On example is how the recovery of fish stocks in Europe has led to increased fishing pressure in West African waters. Another is how improved regulations of Chinese and European forests have led to deforestation in the tropics due to increased Chinese and European biomass imports. This not only has global environmental consequences but social ones as well, since people’s livelihoods in those distant places are often negatively impacted.An approach of “out of sight, out of mind” can mean big problems when dealing with complex social-ecological challenges and can put into question well-intended place based sustainability practices.

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Designed to disseminate and disclose rigorous information on climate change.

Science Education and Public Awareness

Raising awareness of Climate Change at Basque Country Scale

BC3 Initiatives in collaboration with external organizations